Cube carving

I had an idea to carve multiple grips on a cube of wood, it is 70mm, just the right size for a handhold. One at a time I persuaded 6 people to grasp the block while I traced around their fingers and thumbs. Carving out search set at a time, I was able to keep the sets from overlapping too much. One grip is like that of a cricket ball, finger tips only, another held it just with thumb and forefinger, then a variety of different holds but only one left-handed. The sizes varied quite a bit too.

I wrote their names near their thumbs whilst I was carving but I might sand those off. It’s interesting that everyone found their finger holds easily if they began by finding their thumb position.

  

Experiments in wood carving.

Lime wood is great to begin with as it is very smooth,  fine-grained and really quite soft hence easy to cut. I started with learning to cut straight gouged lines along the grain. The wood naturally curls up as it is cut, I thought about leaving the little coils attached as they looked so good but they’re very brittle and would have fallen off very soon anyway.

  

Wood carving

This is my first time on a wood carving course. I am being taught by Malcolm Martin, he and his partner are pass masters, what a joy to be taught by such a talented man.

This is my first proper attempt, about an hour in, lots more very tricky cutting to do. I have made a rod for my own back as the whole piece is only the size of a postcard, wish I had made it larger. 

 
  

Systems – Rotation, Reversal, Chance

Playing around with a system of rotation and reversal of a simple shape, I corrugated the paper cut-outs which adds an element of chance in how the light falls, the pieces are not attached and naturally curl up in random ways. Half the cut-outs were corrugated top to bottom, the rest side to side. Of course the corrugations shortened the lengths so the pieces no longer fill the squares properly. For a few moments this looked wonderful in strong sunlight but now it’s cloudy again.  


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